1987-1996 Ford Bronco | Used vehicle spotlight

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1987-1996 Ford Bronco | Used vehicle spotlight originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 20 Jul 2021 15:44:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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What’s driving the spike in air-cooled Porsche 911 prices

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Speed Academy runs a piece looking at what's driving the skyrocketing prices of air-cooled Porsche 911s. One theory is that Joe-the-Plumber owners are valuing their own high-mileage daily drivers according to the bubble-like prices being asked for pristine, low-mileage examples.

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What's driving the spike in air-cooled Porsche 911 prices originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 26 Mar 2015 15:59:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Porsche 911 2.7 RS values up by nearly 700% in the last 10 years [w/video]

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If you're looking for an automotive investment and have a few hundred thousand dollars to burn, then you might want to look away from Ferrari and towards Porsche. The 1973 Porsche Carrera 2.7 RS is the highest appreciating car of the last 10 years, at least in the UK. The value of these homologation specials is up 669 percent in just the last decade.

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Porsche 911 2.7 RS values up by nearly 700% in the last 10 years [w/video] originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 01 Jan 2015 11:57:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Porsche 911 2.7 RS values up by nearly 700% in the last 10 years [w/video]

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If you're looking for an automotive investment and have a few hundred thousand dollars to burn, then you might want to look away from Ferrari and towards Porsche. The 1973 Porsche Carrera 2.7 RS is the highest appreciating car of the last 10 years, at least in the UK. The value of these homologation specials is up 669 percent in just the last decade.

Continue reading Porsche 911 2.7 RS values up by nearly 700% in the last 10 years [w/video]

Porsche 911 2.7 RS values up by nearly 700% in the last 10 years [w/video] originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 01 Jan 2015 11:57:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Why you should run out and buy a vintage Aston Martin Lagonda right now

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Aston Martin Lagonda

Aston Martin LagondaAston Martin has a reputation for crafting some of the world's finest luxury GTs, and with a little help from James Bond, it has also become a quintessential British brand. While the company's models are known for combining speed and luxury, they certainly aren't recognized for being inexpensive. However, there might be a way to get the Aston badge and potentially make a little extra money if you ever decide to divest. Bloomberg suggests looking outside the mainstream by taking a closer look at the original wedge-shaped Lagonda (above).

First shown in the mid '70s, the Lagonda looks like nothing else on the road before or since. Early models feature pop-up headlights and styling so sharp the sedan appears to be slicing through the air, even while sitting still. Later revisions softened the design slightly, and even Aston Martin's modern reinterpretation (inset) doesn't go as far as its predecessor. The interior is what really makes the Lagonda famous (or infamous), though. With instruments displayed on LEDs or CRT screens, depending on model, it's like the science fiction in there. Power is provided by a 5.3-liter V8 quoted at around 280 horsepower, according to Aston Martin.

Unfortunately, the Lagonda's avant-garde styling and reputation for unreliability hasn't garnered much love for the super saloon over the years. Aston Martin only made 645 of them by the time production ended in 1989. The tide appears to be turning, though, and the sedan's value is rising strongly. According to Bloomberg, citing Hagerty, prices currently average about $44,000, up 61 percent since 2010, and the later, somewhat more reliable examples are up 85 percent. Perhaps those values are soaring because those lining up for the new Lagonda (a.k.a. Taraf) are looking for a historical counterpart to display alongside their next car.

Head over to Bloomberg to get the full story on why it might be time to reconsider these once unloved four-door Astons.

Why you should run out and buy a vintage Aston Martin Lagonda right now originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 18 Nov 2014 19:02:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Will this McLaren F1 sell for over $12 million at Pebble Beach?

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1995 McLaren F1 #0065

Decades ago, a dominant Formula One team made a few dozen examples of a sports car that was as devastating on the track as it was on the road, and as such, it has become highly sought-after by collectors willing to pay millions - even tens of millions - for the privilege of ownership. We have to be talking about the Ferrari 250 GTO, right? We very well could be, but in this case, no: we're talking about the McLaren F1 - a legendary supercar whose values seem to be skyrocketing in the footsteps of its arch-rival's most iconic classic. And if this latest pre-auction estimate is anything to go by, it will only continue to climb as quickly as it accelerates.

The past couple of McLaren F1s on whose sales we've reported traded hands for over $5 million apiece and we thought that was pretty spectacular, but this latest example consigned to Gooding & Company for its upcoming sale at Pebble Beach has an expected selling price of between $12 million and $14 million.

Chassis No. 031, a 1995 model, is a bit of a rarity in that it's one of only a handful of McLaren F1s painted in white, and the only one in this particular shade of Marlboro White, adopting the color of the grand prix team's title sponsor at the time. It's had only three owners who've put barely over 1,000 miles on the odometer, starting in Japan, where it resided with collector Shin Okamoto for 15 years before he sold it to a collector in Chicago, who in turn sold it to its current owner who's putting it up for auction. The 27th example built, it's said to be in "highly original" condition, was extensively serviced at the McLaren factory as recently as 2008, and comes with all its original manuals, tools and fitted luggage.

Is all of that enough to make this 1995 McLaren F1 worth more than twice what they've been going for? If someone pays it, we suppose it will. But the McLaren isn't even the most expensive lot consigned for the auction. Little surprise, it'll have to compete with a number of much older Ferrari models for that honor: a 250 GT SWB California Spider is estimated to fetch $13-15 million, the estimate for a similar coupe has not even been released, and a rare three-seater 1966 Ferrari 365 P Berlinetta Speciale could go for over $20 million.

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Will this McLaren F1 sell for over $12 million at Pebble Beach? originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 29 Jul 2014 16:57:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Investing in blue-chip classic cars has been lucrative this decade

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Classic car values have been increasing quickly in the past decade.

There's always a financial risk with investing in collectibles - and that includes cars. They must be maintained and stored, which costs more money, and ultimately sold (they're investments, right?). On top of that, if they're driven, they can be damaged or just lose value with more miles. But lately, the rate of return from investing in some collectibles - particularly classic cars - has been much higher than that of traditional investments, The Economist reports.

According to an index of the 50 most valuable automobiles compiled by the Historic Automobile Group and cited by The Economist, the past decade has been a great time to invest in blue-chip classic cars. Since 2002, their value has risen by almost 450 percent, which is a much larger increase than that of the MSCI World index, an index of stocks in developed markets, which increased by a relatively paltry 147 percent during the same period.

A case in point, The Economist points out, is one of the most expensive, ultra-rare classic cars to be sold at auction this year at Pebble Beach: a 1957 Ferrari 250 GT 14-Louver Berlinetta that sold for $9.46 million. The gavel price was within the car's estimated price range of $9 million to $11 million. An even better case in point at Monterey Week this year was the 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 NART Spider that sold for $27.5 million, a record sum for a car sold in the US - the second-highest price paid for a car at auction ever. On top of that, it beat the high end of its presale estimate by over $10 million! The most expensive auction car ever remains Juan Manuel Fangio's Mercedes W196R F1 racer, which sold earlier this year for $29.65 million. Last year, a 1936 Mercedes-Benz 540K von Krieger Special Roadster was auctioned off for almost $12 million. In 2011, a 1957 Ferrari Testa Rossa prototype sold for over $16 million. You get the picture.

But if you're not into making money on classic cars, then maybe you should start a collection of stamps, coins or violins, all of which have been increasing in value for the past decade. Or just go to work.

Investing in blue-chip classic cars has been lucrative this decade originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 03 Sep 2013 16:31:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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