This 1956 Packard pickup conversion imagines a progenitor to today’s luxury trucks

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Continue reading This 1956 Packard pickup conversion imagines a progenitor to today's luxury trucks

This 1956 Packard pickup conversion imagines a progenitor to today's luxury trucks originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 5 Jan 2021 15:23:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Budweiser, Lyft partner to provide rides in Prohibition-era cars

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Sometimes, beer and cars go together well.

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Budweiser, Lyft partner to provide rides in Prohibition-era cars originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 24 Oct 2017 08:30:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Packard should rise from the ashes

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If ever there was an automotive brand that had style, and by that I mean "American" style, it was Packard.

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Packard should rise from the ashes originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 04 Apr 2017 13:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Detroit’s Packard plant starting to look like 1930 again

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Fernando Palazeulo is restoring the 40-acre Packard Plant complex in Detroit, starting with the pedestrian bridge over East Grand Boulevard: he's had it draped in a covering that makes the bridge look like it did in 1930.

Continue reading Detroit's Packard plant starting to look like 1930 again

Detroit's Packard plant starting to look like 1930 again originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 25 May 2015 12:01:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Allan Hill, last resident of Detroit’s iconic Packard plant may get pushed out [w/video]

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Allan Hill lives at the Packard Plant

The old Packard Plant in Detroit is one of the city's icons. All at once, it represents the vibrant history of the Motor City, its rocky past decades and the chance for something new to spring up. Despite the Packard buildings sitting empty for years, there's still life there. Among other things, it's a common spot for artists to practice their work, including Banksy several years ago. However, recent demolitions might bring a final end to the famous spot as we know it and threatens to make the site's only legal resident homeless, along with it.

According to The Detroit News, Allan Hill has been living in a warehouse on the Packard Plant campus for about the last eight years. He has become the site's caretaker of sorts by trying to prevent further destruction there and giving tours to visitors.

Now, the owner of the warehouse is putting the building up for sale, as part of increased development at the dilapidated factory. Read The Detroit News' report to learn more about Hill and the plant's future, and scroll down to watch a video about this fascinating man and his home.

Continue reading Allan Hill, last resident of Detroit's iconic Packard plant may get pushed out [w/video]

Allan Hill, last resident of Detroit's iconic Packard plant may get pushed out [w/video] originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 15 Oct 2014 09:45:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age

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In the 1950s and early 60s, the dawn of nuclear power was supposed to lead to a limitless consumer culture, a world of flying cars and autonomous kitchens all powered by clean energy. In Europe, it offered the then-limping continent a cheap, inexhaustible supply of power after years of rationing and infrastructure damage brought on by two World Wars.

The development of nuclear-powered submarines and ships during the 1940s and 50s led car designers to begin conceptualizing atomic vehicles. Fueled by a consistent reaction, these cars would theoretically produce no harmful byproducts and rarely need to refuel. Combining these vehicles with the new interstate system presented amazing potential for American mobility.

But the fantasy soon faded. There were just too many problems with the realities of nuclear power. For starters, the powerplant would be too small to attain a reaction unless the car contained weapons-grade atomic materials. Doing so would mean every fender-bender could result in a minor nuclear holocaust. Additionally, many of the designers assumed a lightweight shielding material or even forcefields would eventually be invented (they still haven't) to protect passengers from harmful radiation. Analyses of the atomic car concept at the time determined that a 50-ton lead barrier would be necessary to prevent exposure.

Although hope is still alive for nuclear-powered cars - engines powered by lasers and Thorium salts have been suggested - it's amusing to think that there was a time when these cars were seriously considered the future of transportation. Our love affair with nuclear energy has waned considerably since the catastrophes at Chernobyl, Three Mile Island and, most recently, Fukushima.

Take a trip back in time to when creativity was out matched only by naïveté by checking out these nuclear-powered car concepts from automakers like Ford and Studebaker-Packard. Radiation suit not included.

Continue reading Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age

Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:31:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age

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In the 1950s and early 60s, the dawn of nuclear power was supposed to lead to a limitless consumer culture, a world of flying cars and autonomous kitchens all powered by clean energy. In Europe, it offered the then-limping continent a cheap, inexhaustible supply of power after years of rationing and infrastructure damage brought on by two World Wars.

The development of nuclear-powered submarines and ships during the 1940s and 50s led car designers to begin conceptualizing atomic vehicles. Fueled by a consistent reaction, these cars would theoretically produce no harmful byproducts and rarely need to refuel. Combining these vehicles with the new interstate system presented amazing potential for American mobility.

But the fantasy soon faded. There were just too many problems with the realities of nuclear power. For starters, the powerplant would be too small to attain a reaction unless the car contained weapons-grade atomic materials. Doing so would mean every fender-bender could result in a minor nuclear holocaust. Additionally, many of the designers assumed a lightweight shielding material or even forcefields would eventually be invented (they still haven't) to protect passengers from harmful radiation. Analyses of the atomic car concept at the time determined that a 50-ton lead barrier would be necessary to prevent exposure.

Although hope is still alive for nuclear-powered cars - engines powered by lasers and Thorium salts have been suggested - it's amusing to think that there was a time when these cars were seriously considered the future of transportation. Our love affair with nuclear energy has waned considerably since the catastrophes at Chernobyl, Three Mile Island and, most recently, Fukushima.

Take a trip back in time to when creativity was out matched only by naïveté by checking out these nuclear-powered car concepts from automakers like Ford and Studebaker-Packard. Radiation suit not included.

Continue reading Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age

Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:31:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age

Filed under: , , , , ,



In the 1950s and early 60s, the dawn of nuclear power was supposed to lead to a limitless consumer culture, a world of flying cars and autonomous kitchens all powered by clean energy. In Europe, it offered the then-limping continent a cheap, inexhaustible supply of power after years of rationing and infrastructure damage brought on by two World Wars.

The development of nuclear-powered submarines and ships during the 1940s and 50s led car designers to begin conceptualizing atomic vehicles. Fueled by a consistent reaction, these cars would theoretically produce no harmful byproducts and rarely need to refuel. Combining these vehicles with the new interstate system presented amazing potential for American mobility.

But the fantasy soon faded. There were just too many problems with the realities of nuclear power. For starters, the powerplant would be too small to attain a reaction unless the car contained weapons-grade atomic materials. Doing so would mean every fender-bender could result in a minor nuclear holocaust. Additionally, many of the designers assumed a lightweight shielding material or even forcefields would eventually be invented (they still haven't) to protect passengers from harmful radiation. Analyses of the atomic car concept at the time determined that a 50-ton lead barrier would be necessary to prevent exposure.

Although hope is still alive for nuclear-powered cars - engines powered by lasers and Thorium salts have been suggested - it's amusing to think that there was a time when these cars were seriously considered the future of transportation. Our love affair with nuclear energy has waned considerably since the catastrophes at Chernobyl, Three Mile Island and, most recently, Fukushima.

Take a trip back in time to when creativity was out matched only by naïveté by checking out these nuclear-powered car concepts from automakers like Ford and Studebaker-Packard. Radiation suit not included.

Continue reading Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age

Nuclear-powered concept cars from the Atomic Age originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:31:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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1934 Packard convertible takes Best In Show at Pebble Beach

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1934 Packard 1108 Twelve Dietrich Convertible Victoria

Hard decisions have been made, score sheets have been tallied and a new car now reigns over the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. The 2013 Best In Show winner here at Pebble is the 1934 Packard 1108 Twelve Dietrich Convertible Victoria owned by Joseph and Margie Cassini of West Orange, NJ. We'll give you a second to memorize that name.

The vehicle that beat out a huge field of worthy competitors is special indeed, despite being relatively unknown outside of the concours set. A giant open touring car - typical of the American metal of this social strata and era - the very scale of Packard is massive by modern standards. Well-known coachbuilder Dietrich stretched elegant flowing fenders, closed in the rear, to encompass the Packard's 140-plus-inch wheelbase. Powered by a pristine, L-head V12 engine, probably pushing something in the neighborhood of 150 horsepower, the pre-war coupe is more of a stroller than a sprinter. But the judges aren't bound to take performance into consideration when it comes to the utterly patrician field of competitors.

A similar 1934 Packard Victoria Convertible by Dietrich received a high bid of $2.2 million at an RM Auction in Amelia Island last year, but it seems as though the car went unsold. Chances are good that this very rare breed of Packard is due a slight bump in value after today.

Congratulations to The Cassinis, to the officials at Pebble Beach and to all the attendees lucky enough to catch a glimpse of yet another champion automobile.

1934 Packard convertible takes Best In Show at Pebble Beach originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 18 Aug 2013 20:32:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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